Abraham Lincoln

Emancipation Proclamation

The Emancipation Proclamation, or Proclamation 95, was a presidential proclamation and executive order issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln effective January 1, 1863. It changed the legal status under federal law of more than 3.5 million enslaved African Americans in the Confederate states from slave to free. As soon as a slave escaped the …Read More

"Battle of Antietam," by Thure de Thulstrup

Battle of Antietam

The Battle of Antietam (also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg) was fought on September 17, 1862. The battle was a decisive engagement in the American Civil War and the bloodiest one-day battle in American history. Background The battle came at the end of the Maryland Campaign, an offensive led by Confederate General Robert E. …Read More

"The Assassination of Abraham Lincoln," by Currier & Ives, 1865

Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

President Abraham Lincoln was shot on April 14, 1865, around 10 o’clock at night while attending a play at Ford’s Theatre in Washington DC. The assassin, actor John Wilkes Booth, entered the Lincolns’ box and shot the president in the back of the head before jumping over the railing and down onto the stage. A …Read More

Abraham Lincoln, 1863

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. …Read More

Battle of Gettysburg

Battle of Gettysburg

The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863)?was the?bloodiest?battle of the Civil War. It took place around Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and is often considered the turning point of the war. Following a series of military successes in Virginia, Confederate general Robert E. Lee took his troops up into south-central Pennsylvania in June 1863 in an invasion of …Read More